Ruptures Radio Show // MUNMA Edition #1 // 23 May 2016

On the occasion of the release of Munma‘s new LP Three Voices in Beirut, this edition of the Ruptures radio show featured demos, album tracks, exclusive versions and remixes culled from this talented Lebanese producer’s 10-year (and ongoing) career.


Track listing:
1. Munma: Soft Integration (Previews and Premises, 2010)
2. Munma: A Tribute to Mahjoub Omar (demo, 2013)
3. El Rass & Munma: ‘Awdat al Batriq (Adam, Darwin & the Batriq, 2014)
4. Munma with Naserdayn el Touffar: Nay (demo, 2014)
5. Munma: Munma (34 Days, 2006)
6. Munma: IRM (Black Tuesday, 2007)
7. Munma: Engram (Unholy Republic, 2008)
8. Trash Inc. & Munma: Nightwalker #2 (demo, 2009)
9. Index/Left: Hecatonchires (demo, 2010)
10. Scrambled Eggs: Bleeding Nun (Munma remix, from Happy Together Filthy Forever, 2006)
11. Litter: Hummingbird (Munma remix, from Newfound Grids, 2012)
12. Infinite Moment of Composure: Infiltration (Turbulence, 2012)
13. Tasjil Moujahed: Aviatrix (Musafer, 2012)
14. Munma feat. radiokvm: The Funeral (No Apologies, 2013)


34 days

Munma black-Tuesday low-res

Unholy Republic low-res

IMOC

Tasjiil Moujahed 1

CEASAR K // INTERVIEW #2 // 11 Aug 2014

Lebanese DJ, producer, turntablist and label owner Ceasar K was the guest of Ruptures for the second time, for an interview covering the production output of his label VL Records.

Listen: ruptures ceasar k 11 august (part 1) + ruptures ceasar k 11 august (part 2)

Track listing:
Moe Turk
vChille
Audible Astronaut
Escape To Venus
Trash Inc.
Funk Sinatra
Moe Turk
Cheh & Fady Aswad
Trash Inc.
Escape To Venus


Ruptures Radio Show // 14 Apr 2014

Monday 14 April 2014, Radio Lebanon 96.2FM (8-9pm)

1. Loopstache
2. Loopstache [Franz Ferdinand cover]
3. Who Killed Bruce Lee
4. Spoils & Servants
5. Wake Island
6. Wanton Bishops
7. Scrambled Eggs
8. Jammit The Band
9. El Far3i
10. Latlateh
11. Deeb (feat. Edd Abbas)


12. Tripnol
13. Khotta B
14. Chyno
15. Trash Inc. [Mohammed Abdel-Wahab Rework]
16. Aziza
17. Fady Aswad


 

 

Review // Munma // Unholy Republic

[April 2009]

MUNMA: UNHOLY REPUBLIC (Incognito, 2009)

The third official release by Lebanese electronic artist Jawad Nawfal sees him revisiting familiar themes and musical landscapes, while displaying the possibility for some radical departures in the near future. ‘Unholy Republic’ is the third installment of what is commonly referred to as the “Fate trilogy”, one that saw the day in the aftermath of the war waged by Israel on Lebanon in summer 2006. The first two releases, ‘34 Days’ and ‘Black Tuesday’, were marked by ominous moods and atmospheres, sets of menacing clicks and glitches, and a random selection of radio samples and speeches that conveyed brilliantly the mind-set and feelings of the artist, regarding the crisis at hand.

‘Unholy Republic’ picks up where ‘Black Tuesday’ left, with a rambling, brooding track haunted by static, radio noise, and some politician’s vehement preaching. This is followed by two tracks of subdued electronica, reminiscent of Munma’s previous releases. ‘Engram’, in particular, nods prominently towards South American musician Murcof’s output for the Leaf label. The rest of the album is more surprising, as Munma’s recent partner-in-crime, Nabil Saliba aka Trash Inc, enters the fray, and contributes his supple synth-enhanced melodies to ‘Broken Chime’ and ‘Deep Down Inside’. These show a different facet of Munma’s talent, and serve as a timely reminder that Jawad Nawfal is equally at ease devising ambient landscapes and dancefloor “stompers”. ‘Unholy Republic’ concludes on a short, ambient postcard entitled ‘Exodus’, signalling in the process the end of the “Fate trilogy”, and prefiguring realms of possibilities for Munma’s subsequent works.


LISTEN:

Audio 1: Engram

Audio 2: Deep Down


Review // Munma & Trash Inc. // Live at B018

[September 2008]

Neither Jawad Nawfal (aka Munma) nor Nabil Saliba (aka Trash Inc.) is new to live venues or performing in front of a crowded audience. Jawad has taken his AEX and Munma formations to various venues in Lebanon (the Basement, Club Social, the Byblos Festival…), as well as abroad, while Nabil Saliba’s previous drumming duties with Franco-Lebanese rock band New Government also induced its fair share of live performing… but neither one of them was quite ready for this.

The atmosphere at B018 that night was quite different from anything the boys had witnessed before, or anything this famed dance venue had come to present its audience. As it slowly filled up, there was a general feeling of anticipation, of eager expectation, good humored and friendly, regarding this live electronic/dance concert, these two bands’ first in B018 . And those patient enough to wait for them to take the stage at 3am, were not disappointed.

Dj Caroline started warming the crowd at 2am, and had a hard time getting a grip on the venue’s rugged equipment, seeing that the available CD players had presumably been taken to hell and back by previous hard-hitting hordes of DJ’s, both local and foreign. She played a decent set, consisting mostly of breaks and electro-house, until Munma and Trash Inc. were urged to take the stage by an impatient crowd. From the beginning, they established the tone of the proceedings: an insistent, pumping electronic beat filtered through the speakers, giving them free rein to layer swathes of intricate loops and sounds. Nabil on synths and laptop-operated machinery, Jawad on yet another set up of computers and machines meshed and mingled a vast array of sounds, ranging from house-ish beats, minimal glitches and clicks, to synthesized riffs straight out of 80’s and 90’s early dance productions. They even threw in some vocals in the mix, to the general delighted disbelief of their fans and friends, now filling B018 to the brim.

Listen to the concert by clicking on the following link: munma-trash-inc-live-b018

As their set proceeded, the boys scaled some unexpected heights, even for those of us who had become habituated to their oblique musical directions. They created a dense, compact core of beat-based reverberation, allowing them to geneerate a vast array of intricate sounds, which were then looped back and forth, then layered again to create a bright, shining sound-mass hovering between breaks, electro, and hard hitting tech-house.