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Posts Tagged ‘electronica’

A radio program entirely dedicated to electronica artist Munma,

Featuring demos, album tracks, exclusive versions and remixes from this talented Lebanese young man’s 10-year (and going) career:

1. Munma: Soft Integration (Previews and Premises, 2010)
2. Munma: A Tribute to Mahjoub Omar (demo, 2013)
3. El Rass & Munma: ‘Awdat al Batriq (Adam, Darwin & the Batriq, 2014)
4. Munma with Naserdayn el Touffar: Nay (demo, 2014)
5. Munma: Munma (34 Days, 2006)
6. Munma: IRM (Black Tuesday, 2007)
7. Munma: Engram (Unholy Republic, 2008)
8. Trash Inc. & Munma: Nightwalker #2 (demo, 2009)
9. Index/Left: Hecatonchires (demo, 2010)
10. Scrambled Eggs: Bleeding Nun (Munma remix, from Happy Together Filthy Forever, 2006)
11. Litter: Hummingbird (Munma remix, from Newfound Grids, 2012)
12. Infinite Moment of Composure: Infiltration (Turbulence, 2012 / vox by Maria Kassab)
13. Tasjil Moujahed: Aviatrix (Musafer, 2012 / vox by Maria Kassab)
14. Munma feat. radiokvm: The Funeral (No Apologies, 2013)

Listen: ruptures munma lundi 26 oct

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34 days

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Munma black-Tuesday low-res

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unholy Republic low-res

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMOC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tasjiil Moujahed 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Renowned American electronic musician Bob Ostertag was the guest of Ruptures, for an interview covering different aspects of his long and intensely rich music practice.

Listen to the full show: BOB OSTERTAG on RUPTURES

For more on Bob Ostertag: http://bobostertag.com/

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Ostertag

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Friday 21 December 2014, Radio Lebanon 96.2FM (8-9pm)

1. Maurice Louca [Egypt]
2. Boikutt [Palestine]
3. El Rass & Munma [Lebanon]
4. El Far3i [Jordan]
5. Naserdayn al Touffar (prod. Munma) [Lebanon]
6. Khotta Ba [Jordan]
7. Satti (prod. Edd Abbas) [Jordan]

> Listen to Part 1Ruptures Monday 21 Dec (part 1)

8. Edd Abbas [Lebanon]
9. Tripnol [Lebanon]
10. Fareeq el Atrash [Lebanon]
11. Chyno [Lebanon]
12. Deeb [Egypt]
13. Maryam Saleh [Egypt]
14. Maurice Louca [Egypt]
15. Boikutt [Palestine]
16. Zeineddine & Narcicyst [Lebanon/Iraq]

> Listen to Part 2Ruptures Monday 21 Dec (part 2)

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The record of the evening:

a3323419700_10

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Ruptured presents:

A launch concert for Lebanese electronic artist RADIOKVM‘s first release ISSRAR

Featuring live music by radiokvm & live video by Rami el Sabbagh

[ISSRAR is the first vinyl release from Ruptured. It will be available in a limited edition of 300 hand-numbered LP’s with gourmet jacket]

 
RADIOKVM

Hailing from Beirut, Lebanon, SARY MOUSSA aka RADIOKVM is a self-taught electronic musician. Constantly busy absorbing, analyzing and trying to reproduce in his own manner the ambient sounds surrounding him, he started taking music lessons as a kid, but soon found out that experimentation, e-learning, reading and trial and error processes were a lot more efficient and interesting. He was into making electronic music, and no one around him knew what a synth, a filter or a drum machine were!

Moussa grew up listening to rock and jazz, before delving headlong into electronica. He started crafting his own melodies under the moniker radiokvm in 2008. He collaborated closely with Lebanese producer Okydoky, organizing live gigs and releasing a batch of demos; the two men became notorious on the live circuit of Beirut’s electronic scene. In later years, Moussa collaborated with Lebanese electronic producers Munma, Jad Atoui, and Liliane Chlela, releasing both remixes and original compositions for label compilations; he has also composed music for theatre and dance performances (Ali Chahrour’s ‘Fatmeh’), as well as soundtracks for short films.

RAMI el SABBAGH

Born in Beirut in 1979, Rami el Sabbagh is a Lebanese video maker. He graduated from the Institute of Scenic and Audio-Visual Studies (IESAV), Saint Joseph University in Beirut in 2004. His videos include ‘C’est de ta faute, quelque part’ (It’s Somewhat Your Fault, 2003), ‘2mg of Rotten Blood on Pure White Snow’, and ‘The Last Hero’ (2012). He is also a VJ since 2005 and a DJ since 2006.

Poster-BAC-kvm2

[In collaboration with Tunefork, Beirut Art Center, Beirut Jam Sessions and Al-Akhbar]

 

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[Article written for PRIME JORDAN MAGAZINE]

Despite the traces and scars of numerous battles and confrontations, the city of Beirut manages to this day, as the song goes, to “shake itself up, dust itself off, and start all over again”… This constant state of rejuvenation is found in various walks of Lebanese life, but more so in the fields of art, and especially that of music.

The city of Beirut and its neighborhoods are alive with the sounds, sonorities and tunes of hundreds of musicians, moving at ease between different styles and categories, from traditional workouts to oriental jazz, from rap to punk, and from dance-floor electro to more nuanced strands of electronica…

In a city famous from its happy blending of cultures and influences, Lebanese bands also operate a mixture of genres: Soapkills’ explosive cocktail of traditional Arabic music and electro has made them the best-known duo of the Middle Eastern Underground, and one of its finest exports. Their first album, Bater, features outstanding contributions from local jazz musicians Rabih Mroué (flute) and Walid Sadek (trumpet).

The Soapkills’ main man, Zeid Hamdan, is also a towering presence on the rock scene, as guitar player with the New Government. The latter are the true dandies of the Lebanese rock scene. Coming from different musical backgrounds, the perfect synergy these five musicians create has already resulted in the New Government Strikes album, which combines great melodies and subtlety with punk energy and style. Flashes of British ‘60s psychedelia (Kinks, Small Faces) abound, interspersed with modern flourishes.

In another corner of the rock ‘front’, stand the Scrambled Eggs. By far one of the most interesting alternative rock bands operating in Beirut today, the Scrambled Eggs’ music is dark, strange and fascinating, and provides the perfect soundtrack to post-war Beirut.
Over the course of 3 albums, and then some, the band has managed to create its own distinctive sound, a fine mesh of guitars and noises, pushing to the extreme the search for harmony in chaos.

Jawad Nawfal knows a great deal about the fine line(s) between harmony and chaos. Not content with his status as Beirut’s first and foremost Drum&Bass/HardTech DJ, he has created an alter-ego for his more ‘restrained’ musical ventures, under the moniker Munma. The band’s first release, 34 Days, is a set of 6 electro-ambient tracks, featuring minimal beats, ominous vocal samples, and a rich tapestry of interlocking, layered sounds. 34 Days recalls the ethereal, hushed moods of Warp label artists such as Boards of Canada and Aphex Twin at their ambient best; with an oriental twist, added for good measure.

Last but not least, Beirut’s rap scene is filled with various luminaries: Ashekman, RGB, Kitayoun, Katibe Khamse, and of course Rayess Bek… Wael Kodeih (aka Rayess Bek) single-handedly created the Lebanese rap scene in the ‘90s with his band Aks’ser. They’ve been growing ever since, and released their first full-fledged album on major label EMI in 2006. Wael’s solo project Rayess Bek has allowed him to deal with more serious issues; he raps about social, economical and political problems: the corrupt government of his country, a society on the brink of collapse, and disoriented youth.

Ziad Nawfal

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[Critique publiée dans l’Agenda Culturel, Beyrouth]

A l’annonce de la sortie de l’album solo du chanteur d’un grand groupe de rock, l’auditeur potentiel est souvent pris de peur, et se pose immanquablement les mêmes questions : Pourquoi ce disque ? L’effort en valait-il vraiment la chandelle ? Est-ce la maison de disque qui l’a oblige a voler de ses propres ailes ? Le groupe va-t-il se séparer ? Est-il plausible que le chanteur puisse sortir un disque digne de ce nom, sans l’alchimie présente habituellement en studio entre lui et ses acolytes ?
Dans le cas de l’album solo de Thom Yorke, chanteur du groupe Radiohead (l’un des plus prestigieux groupes de rock Britanniques actuellement, a classer au meme rang que les Pink Floyd et Genesis de naguère, et ce, sans même risquer qu’une horde de fans outrages ne crie au sacrilège…), a ces questions s’ajoute la suivante : un disque solo de Yorke ne signifie t-il pas aussi tous les défauts de Radiohead (car il doit bien y en avoir quelques-uns) projetés encore plus en avant ? Comment ne pas craindre que la tendance au miaulement et a la geignerie dudit Thom, déjà apparente sur les derniers albums du groupe, ne soit omniprésente sur ce disque ?
‘The Eraser’ porte bien son titre, car d’un seul coup de pinceau (sonore), Yorke efface toutes ces questions, et délivre là une petite merveille de pop érudite, voire de rock expérimental, teinté d’electronica discrète et inventive. En l’espace de 9 morceaux, celui qui est d’habitude réduit au rôle de la « voix » de Radiohead demontre qu’il est non seulement capable de prouesses derrière le micro, mais aussi qu’il possède un don d’écriture et de composition musicale imparables. Sur « The Eraser », Yorke s’éloigne quelque peu des préoccupations sociopolitiques du précédent album de son groupe (‘Hail to the Thief’, en 2003, dont le titre constituait déjà une attaque contre l’Amérique en voie de re-élection de George W. Bush…), et emprunte une voie bien plus personnelle. L’album se laisse écouter comme une série de vignettes sonores, chacune plus étonnante que la précédente, où les ballades calmes côtoient des morceaux plus turbulents, a la limite de la violence, mais il s’agirait la d’une violence contenue, internalisée, sans cesse prête à jaillir… Et c’est là toute la force de ce  disque : ce parfait équilibre entre calme et tumulte, présent aussi bien au niveau de la voix, tantôt calme et maîtrisée (‘Analyse’, ‘Black Swan’), tantôt sombre et menaçante (‘Skip Divided’), qu’à celui de la musique, tour à tour apaisée, puis à la limite de l’éruption.
Encore une fois, ce jeune homme tourmenté réussit a étonner ses fans, et à a offrir à a leur nombre croissant un disque déconcertant, débordant d’originalité et d’inventivité.

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