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Posts Tagged ‘Beirut’

Monday 18 January 2016, Radio Lebanon 96.2FM (8-9pm)

– Praed: Stoned crocodiles (2016)
– Praed: Kill me (2011)
– Raed Yassin w/ Malayeen: Najwa (2013)
– Raed Yassin: Naima (2009)
– Paed Conca w/ Overseas Ensemble: #4 (2015)
– Paed Conca w/ Syg Baas: Trallala (2011)
– Kid Fourteen: Change (2015)
– Jerusalem In My Heart: Yudaghdegh el-ra3ey walal ghanam (2013)
– Praed: Pyramids in the sky (2016)
– Maurice Louca: Idiot (2014)
– Alif: Watti es-sawt (2015)
– Raed Yassin w/ “A” Trio + Alan Bishop: Gently Johnny (2015)
– Praed: 8 Gega (Ruptured session, 2011)

Listen here: ruptures Annihaya 18 janvier

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A radio program entirely dedicated to electronica artist Munma,

Featuring demos, album tracks, exclusive versions and remixes from this talented Lebanese young man’s 10-year (and going) career:

1. Munma: Soft Integration (Previews and Premises, 2010)
2. Munma: A Tribute to Mahjoub Omar (demo, 2013)
3. El Rass & Munma: ‘Awdat al Batriq (Adam, Darwin & the Batriq, 2014)
4. Munma with Naserdayn el Touffar: Nay (demo, 2014)
5. Munma: Munma (34 Days, 2006)
6. Munma: IRM (Black Tuesday, 2007)
7. Munma: Engram (Unholy Republic, 2008)
8. Trash Inc. & Munma: Nightwalker #2 (demo, 2009)
9. Index/Left: Hecatonchires (demo, 2010)
10. Scrambled Eggs: Bleeding Nun (Munma remix, from Happy Together Filthy Forever, 2006)
11. Litter: Hummingbird (Munma remix, from Newfound Grids, 2012)
12. Infinite Moment of Composure: Infiltration (Turbulence, 2012 / vox by Maria Kassab)
13. Tasjil Moujahed: Aviatrix (Musafer, 2012 / vox by Maria Kassab)
14. Munma feat. radiokvm: The Funeral (No Apologies, 2013)

Listen: ruptures munma lundi 26 oct

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34 days

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Munma black-Tuesday low-res

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unholy Republic low-res

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMOC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tasjiil Moujahed 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lebanese electronic musician Sary Moussa, aka radiokvm, was the guest of Ruptures for an interview showcasing various aspects of his production work, as well as the release of his vinyl, ISSRAR, for Lebanese independent label Ruptured.

Listen to Part 1: [We’ve encountered a problem with this file, it should be back online soon]

Listen to Part 2: ruptures radiokvm 13 oct (part 2)

In Beirut, radiokvm’s LP “ISSRAR” can be purchased at Onomatopoeia (Sioufi) and Chico Video (Hamra)
Otherwise, you can find it on Cargo, Amazon, Boomkat and iTunes

To listen to radiokvm’s music on Soundcloud:

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[Photos of the radio session, with Sary Moussa and sound engineer / co-producer Fadi Tabbal]

photo 1

photo 2

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Ruptured presents:

A launch concert for Lebanese electronic artist RADIOKVM‘s first release ISSRAR

Featuring live music by radiokvm & live video by Rami el Sabbagh

[ISSRAR is the first vinyl release from Ruptured. It will be available in a limited edition of 300 hand-numbered LP’s with gourmet jacket]

 
RADIOKVM

Hailing from Beirut, Lebanon, SARY MOUSSA aka RADIOKVM is a self-taught electronic musician. Constantly busy absorbing, analyzing and trying to reproduce in his own manner the ambient sounds surrounding him, he started taking music lessons as a kid, but soon found out that experimentation, e-learning, reading and trial and error processes were a lot more efficient and interesting. He was into making electronic music, and no one around him knew what a synth, a filter or a drum machine were!

Moussa grew up listening to rock and jazz, before delving headlong into electronica. He started crafting his own melodies under the moniker radiokvm in 2008. He collaborated closely with Lebanese producer Okydoky, organizing live gigs and releasing a batch of demos; the two men became notorious on the live circuit of Beirut’s electronic scene. In later years, Moussa collaborated with Lebanese electronic producers Munma, Jad Atoui, and Liliane Chlela, releasing both remixes and original compositions for label compilations; he has also composed music for theatre and dance performances (Ali Chahrour’s ‘Fatmeh’), as well as soundtracks for short films.

RAMI el SABBAGH

Born in Beirut in 1979, Rami el Sabbagh is a Lebanese video maker. He graduated from the Institute of Scenic and Audio-Visual Studies (IESAV), Saint Joseph University in Beirut in 2004. His videos include ‘C’est de ta faute, quelque part’ (It’s Somewhat Your Fault, 2003), ‘2mg of Rotten Blood on Pure White Snow’, and ‘The Last Hero’ (2012). He is also a VJ since 2005 and a DJ since 2006.

Poster-BAC-kvm2

[In collaboration with Tunefork, Beirut Art Center, Beirut Jam Sessions and Al-Akhbar]

 

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A handy guide to finding CD’s by some of the best Lebanese alternative acts around, whilst wandering the streets of Beirut (or thereabouts):

EL RASS & MUNMA
Kechf el Mahjoub / Unveiling the Hidden
> available for sale at Beirut Art Center (Sin el Fil) + Chico Video (Hamra) + Dar Bookstore (Hamra) + Music Now (Hamra)

THE INCOMPETENTS
More Songs from the Victorious City
I’m Really Important Back Home
No Applause
> available for sale at Beirut Art Center (Sin el Fil) + Chico Video (Hamra) + Dar Bookstore (Hamra) + Music Now (Hamra)

MUNMA
34 Days
Black Tuesday
Unholy Republic
Previews & Premises
> available for sale at Beirut Art Center (Sin el Fil) + Chico Video (Hamra) + Dar Bookstore (Hamra) + Music Now (Hamra)

YOUMNA SABA
Men Aafesh El Beit
Hal Bent Aablalha Tghanni
> available for sale at Beirut Art Center (Sin el Fil) + Chico Video (Hamra) + Dar Bookstore (Hamra) + Music Now (Hamra)

SCRAMBLED EGGS
Human Friendly Noises
No Special Date Nor Deity To Venerate
A Perfect Day (OST)
Happy Together Filthy Forever
Je Veux Voir (OST)
Scratching, Tapping, Bowing (by Charbel Haber & Miles Jay)
Dedicated To Foes Celebrating Friends
Peace is Overrated & War Misunderstood
> available for sale at Beirut Art Center (Sin el Fil) + Chico Video (Hamra) + Dar Bookstore (Hamra) + Music Now (Hamra)

The JOHNNY KAFTA’S KIDS MENU CD catalog (Scrambled Eggs & Friends + Scrambled Eggs & ATrio + Mike Cooper)
> available for sale at Beirut Art Center (Sin el Fil) + Chico Video (Hamra) + Dar Bookstore (Hamra) + Music Now (Hamra)

Last but not least,
The RUPTURED CD catalog, including all volumes of the compilation series The Ruptured Sessions
> available for sale at Beirut Art Center (Sin el Fil) + Chico Video (Hamra) + Dar Bookstore (Hamra) + Music Now (Hamra)

>> Note that there are only a dozen copies of the Ruptured Sessions volume 4 CD left in stock… So you might want to hurry!

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[Article written for PRIME JORDAN MAGAZINE]

Despite the traces and scars of numerous battles and confrontations, the city of Beirut manages to this day, as the song goes, to “shake itself up, dust itself off, and start all over again”… This constant state of rejuvenation is found in various walks of Lebanese life, but more so in the fields of art, and especially that of music.

The city of Beirut and its neighborhoods are alive with the sounds, sonorities and tunes of hundreds of musicians, moving at ease between different styles and categories, from traditional workouts to oriental jazz, from rap to punk, and from dance-floor electro to more nuanced strands of electronica…

In a city famous from its happy blending of cultures and influences, Lebanese bands also operate a mixture of genres: Soapkills’ explosive cocktail of traditional Arabic music and electro has made them the best-known duo of the Middle Eastern Underground, and one of its finest exports. Their first album, Bater, features outstanding contributions from local jazz musicians Rabih Mroué (flute) and Walid Sadek (trumpet).

The Soapkills’ main man, Zeid Hamdan, is also a towering presence on the rock scene, as guitar player with the New Government. The latter are the true dandies of the Lebanese rock scene. Coming from different musical backgrounds, the perfect synergy these five musicians create has already resulted in the New Government Strikes album, which combines great melodies and subtlety with punk energy and style. Flashes of British ‘60s psychedelia (Kinks, Small Faces) abound, interspersed with modern flourishes.

In another corner of the rock ‘front’, stand the Scrambled Eggs. By far one of the most interesting alternative rock bands operating in Beirut today, the Scrambled Eggs’ music is dark, strange and fascinating, and provides the perfect soundtrack to post-war Beirut.
Over the course of 3 albums, and then some, the band has managed to create its own distinctive sound, a fine mesh of guitars and noises, pushing to the extreme the search for harmony in chaos.

Jawad Nawfal knows a great deal about the fine line(s) between harmony and chaos. Not content with his status as Beirut’s first and foremost Drum&Bass/HardTech DJ, he has created an alter-ego for his more ‘restrained’ musical ventures, under the moniker Munma. The band’s first release, 34 Days, is a set of 6 electro-ambient tracks, featuring minimal beats, ominous vocal samples, and a rich tapestry of interlocking, layered sounds. 34 Days recalls the ethereal, hushed moods of Warp label artists such as Boards of Canada and Aphex Twin at their ambient best; with an oriental twist, added for good measure.

Last but not least, Beirut’s rap scene is filled with various luminaries: Ashekman, RGB, Kitayoun, Katibe Khamse, and of course Rayess Bek… Wael Kodeih (aka Rayess Bek) single-handedly created the Lebanese rap scene in the ‘90s with his band Aks’ser. They’ve been growing ever since, and released their first full-fledged album on major label EMI in 2006. Wael’s solo project Rayess Bek has allowed him to deal with more serious issues; he raps about social, economical and political problems: the corrupt government of his country, a society on the brink of collapse, and disoriented youth.

Ziad Nawfal

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By far one of the most interesting alternative rock bands operating in Beirut today, Scrambled eggs’ music is dark, strange, and fascinating, and provides the perfect soundtrack to post-war Beirut.

On this, their first album, they are still a band under influence(s), and the latter range from British progressive and alternative rock to more aggressive strands of American rock and pop.

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